Writing Winning Proposals: Public Relations Cases, NEW 3rd Edition

Writing Winning Proposals: Public Relations Cases, NEW 3rd Edition is the only PR case book: 1) with specific rules for writing the components of a public relations proposal/plan; 2) written entirely from a client-employer perspective to show students how to give clients and employers what they want in plans and the way they want it; 3) with instruction shaped by student discourse in 21 upper-division university classes in Writing Public Relations Plans; 4) with role play scripts for students to act out actual case events in the classroom; 5) with real case-related writing assignments; 6) with materials instructors can use over time in developing lesson plans for courses in Introduction to PR, PR Writing, PR Plans, and PR Campaigns; 7) that gives instructors and students a broad range of diverse cases to study in community relations and engagement, media relations, employee relations and empowerment, government relations; crisis management and prevention, risk communication, corporate communication, social media implementation, arts and entertainment, social responsibility promotional endeavors, and event planning; 8) written to motivate students to work in teams to develop PR plans and proposals to solve today’s recurring cases that students are most likely to encounter as they enter the profession; 9) that brings to academe precisely what executive managers want from public relations practitioners; and 10) with learning outcomes specified for each case based on communication theory and social science. Opening this book is like opening the door to the real world of PR with an unvarnished look at the profession and its challenges. Authors of this book are Dr. Rebecca A. Gilliland, Distinguished Professor of Service Learning and Associate Professor of Communication at the University of Indianapolis and Thomas R. Hagley, Senior Instructor of Public Relations Retired, School of Journalism and Communication at the University of Oregon. Available from Cognella Academic Publishing. https://titles.cognella.com/writing-winning-proposals-9781516516360.html

 

Use the White House as a teaching resource

Use the White House as a teaching resource

To those of you who are teaching public relations writing, keep looking to the White House as a resource for wonderful writing assignments that are timely and challenging. Your students will be saying, for example, “Wow, I didn’t know that I could ghostwrite for a President and do it so well!” Following is a third example of using the White House as a resource in teaching public relations writing.

Sample Assignment

Learning Outcome: Experience the joy of ghostwriting your version of appropriate remarks for a speaker who would use your suggestions of words and images to connect in meaningful ways with an audience of 40,000 men, women and youth from around the country and parts of the world.

Public Relations Profession: Thinking about it?

Public Relations Profession: Thinking about it?

If you are thinking about going into the public relations profession, here is some straight talk to consider. The profession can be fun, but requires practitioners to work hard analyzing  situations,  developing communication strategies and measuring results. The profession offers many diverse areas of work and work schedules. For those who choose to climb the ladder toward the top of the profession, responsibilities increase with every step and so does exposure to a higher personal, public profile within and outside an organization.  But taking the risk can be exciting and rewarding. In addition to the work of the profession there are inherent challenges practitioners face. For an honest look at the not-talked-enough-about weaknesses of the profession and how they can be addressed, take this link: Public Relations Profession

 

Public relations internships require guidance from instructors to students

Public relations internships require guidance from instructors to students

Reporting for public relations internships can be a bit scary, even intimidating. Students understandably hope for sponsors to reach out and show them around to facilities and faces. But it shouldn’t feel like the first day of grade school. Students need someone to show them how to prepare for an internship and how to shape it to get something worthwhile out of it. Following is an article for instructors to use in discussing internships in the classroom.  INTERNSHIP DISCUSSION POINTS .